Skip to main content

Hello to Year 10

Tomorrow is my first lesson with the new Year 10 group.  I've just rediscovered a few resources to add in to the mix.

First of all the Bawdsey, Suffolk time lapse video. This is a nice piece of film for bringing home the speed and impact of some marine erosion.

The full (30 minute) timelaspse is here:


'Lines of Defence' Film (Final Cut) from Dylski on Vimeo.


A shorter 6 minute version:



And a video produced by a Year 8 student:



The idea will be to measure the dimensions of our classroom and compare it to the 17meters of erosion that occurred in one year.

In addition, we will then use Google Earth's distance measuring tool to measure 17m from Porstmouth's coastline in various locations.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Getting the curriculum right can set teachers free.

During my NQT year I was a shocking teacher. I lurched from lesson to lesson, with the aim of getting through them.  There was no interconnection between lessons and no sequence of lessons. During my second year of teaching I was very fortunate to be able to work with Jeff Stanfield, then the Geography Advisor for Hampshire and we create several schemes of work together. It became clear to me that individual lessons matter little without a coherent curriculum that binds them together.

In 2008 when I became a middle leader, I inherited a 'curriculum' that was on one page, a bit like this:

I really wish I was joking. The thing is, if teachers are to focus upon planning for every pupil, then they need to be aware of the bigger picture. Working without a scheme of work and a detailed curriculum us crippling. Not only so young people not benefit from a common curriculum entitlement, but much time is wasted in needless planning. Now, I'm not talking about prescription here, but…

In the Covid-19 landscape, belonging is more important than learning.

“You get a strange feeling when you're about to leave a place...like you'll not only miss the people you love but you'll miss the person you are now at this time and this place, because you'll never be this way ever again.” Azar Nafisi, Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books

As a geographer, I can speak with confidence about belonging to a place. Belonging is entwined with the places that we visit and interact with. Every one of us views every place in a slightly different way. Belonging to a place; belonging to a community is an essential human feature.  In the current situation, we ignore nurturing bonds of belonging as we lurch and strive toward online learning at our peril.

During the Covid-19 craziness, take 10 minutes. Pause. Reflect on where you feel belonging.

What did you come up with? For me, I belong to:

my family, spread all around the country. (For clarity this includes Leah Moo as she's bound to ask and the Dog Tryfan). I am separate from my son a…

So what does being an Assistant Headteacher for Teaching and Learning actually mean?

James T. Kirk: I have no idea what I'm supposed to do. I only know what I CAN do.I’ve been an Assistant Headteacher and part of the school’s teaching and learning team for 45 working days now.  I remember a few comments on being appointed back in May along the lines of ‘isn’t everyone responsible for teaching and learning, blah blah…’  Of course, that’s a no brainer as leadership extends right into the classroom (indeed, successful leadership’s roots are firmly in the classroom).  In addition, a few people have asked me what this job actually means. This will be useful for those who may be considering the move.  You can read the first and second posts about the SLT adventure if you like.  I don’t pretend to be any sort of SLT expert by any means, even when I’m growing half a beard for Movember.  Those reading this who are already in SLT may wish to reach out if we share common areas.I’m very lucky to be working in a school that places such a high value on developing teaching and l…