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About me







I'm a founding member of the Geography Collective, a collective of Guerrilla Geography activists, teachers, therapists, academics and artists. We’ve come together to encourage (young) people to see and think about our world in new ways. We make books, websites, events, interventions, explorations and more.

My work has attracted some bling over the years. In 2013 I was recognised with the Ordnance Survey Excellence in Geography Teaching Award by the Royal Geographical Society. I am a Fellow of the RGS and Chartered Geographer. Proud to be a Microsoft Innovative Educator, Jamie Oliver Dream Teacher and Best Teacher Blog of 2011 in the Education Blog Awards. From 2011, I was responsible for developing and implementing a Bring Your Own Device Policy at Priory School and as Curriculum Leader for Geography I increased the headline A*-C GCSE grades by 32%. The department was accredited as a Geographical Association Centre of Excellence.

I consider myself an education activist, organising TeachMeet Pompey and speaking at a range of conferences and events.

In 2013 was the recipient of the Royal Geographical Society's Ordnance Survey Award for excellence in geography teaching.

I'm not a fan of desks, but have sat at one long enough to develop a range of textbooks and award winning online resources including the award winning classroom study aids from Discover the World, a GCSE Revsion Resource for Philip Allan and am currently working on projects for Hodder.

When not working I take mountains, coffee, real ale and running seriously and recently completed the Leith Hill Half Marathon is just over 2 hours and the Brighton Marathon in 4 hours 3 minutes. 

I'm always on an adventure and can be found knocking around in Goring by Sea in West Sussex.


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