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#GAeConf20 TeachMeet



The past month has seen some extraordinary times. When I first learnt of the demise of the annual Geographical Association Conference, it was heartening that Harriet and the team set their sights on creating an online version.

I'm pleased that I could play a small part in this by hosting the 6th GA Conference TeachMeet. This is embedded above. Thank you to the 340 or so that joined at the time. Since then, there have been over 1000 views. Visit the YouTube page to find the links to each presentation and additional resources.

I haven't checked the facts but:
- The largest attendance of a TeachMeet
- The youngest story teller: Theo, aged 5.
- An audience of enthusiastic lurkers from all around the world.

A massive thank you to:
- The story tellers - 14 brilliant chats about simple ideas that work.
- The enthusiastic lurkers who flooded Twitter and YouTube with comments, communication and collaboration.
- The GA team for continuing to support the event.
- Discover the World Education who have sponsored every event.

Next year, the event will return to its face-to-face roots, although I am very tempted to curate another virtual version also to increase participation. What do you think? I'd love to know your thoughts in the comments below.


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